Category Archives: Resources

Image Size for Websites

When designing a website, I look again at the latest recommendations for image size for websites, at the best pixels per inch (PPI). This article from PhotoshopEssentials.com (dated only 2017) says, “there’s simply no such thing as a standard web or screen resolution, if your images are destined for the web, you don’t need to worry about image resolution at all!”

Photoshop Essentials 72 ppi Web Image Myth

The old standard resolution of 72 pixels per inch dates from 1984 with the first Macintosh.  Today’s screens are more like 100-150 ppi; for retinal displays, 300 ppi. Each monitor will show the pixels per inch that it is designed to show or a smaller number if the settings have been changed. Resolution only applies to print images.

A file with a resolution of 72 will be very small when printed and cannot be enlarged with a satisfactory result. The top dialogue box in Adobe’s Photoshop programs applies to images on the screen. The lower box, where the resolution and size in inches appears, applies only to printed images. Photograph set to 200 ppi will still be 200 ppi on screen whether the resolution is set to 72 or 300, and the file size will be the same. But the photo will print very small if set at 72.

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Snazzy Maps is a collection of links to, you guessed it, Snazzy Maps. When a Google Map isn’t enough look a these: Pale Dawn, Midnight Commander, Avocado World, Neon World, and more. A map to match every color scheme.

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Editorially logo and tagline: The Best Writing is Rewriting

Editorially: The Best Writing is Rewriting

Stet’s full title is Stet: A Writer’s Journal on Culture and Technology. Many wonderful articles on how writing on for the web.

It is published by Editorially: The Best Writing is Rewriting, a collaborative writing forum.

STET’s goal is to demystify writing by drawing attention to how writing works. To that end, STET pairs good writing with notes that explain what makes writing good.

Topics on STET range across culture and technology, with special attention paid to the intersections between them. We aim to be as accessible and interesting to both practitioners and users of technology. You won’t find insider lingo here; you will find astute, well-written, and nuanced takes on subjects both timely and timeless.

The title pays homage to a discussion between writer and editor, in which one or the other marks a change “stet,” meaning “let it stand.” It suggests both discussion and revision, elements which we believe are at the heart of good writing.

Visual Content from Visual.ly

The graphic design company Visual.ly specializes in  ”visual content,” information conveyed using a combination of images and language—infographics, videos, interactives, presentations. They pull together storytellers, number crunchers, designers, and animators.

Their Infographics start at $999 and are worth every penny. They are delightful and elegant and effective—the magic word.

Their front page is a continuous scroll of their work, which is amazing: Visual.ly

The blog entries explain data visualization: Visual.ly Blog.

Go to Visual.ly to be inspired and to have a fabulous infographic designed. Three examples   of staff picks:

English Grammar Verbs

Grammar: Verbs at Visually.
A Beginner

The Beginner’s Guide to Wine from  Visual.ly.
All Sci-Fi Spaceships Known to Man

All Sci-Fi Spaceships Known to Man at Visually.

 

The Perfect Website

Addressing the key elements of the perfect website as simply as possible is the basis for designing an affordable, effective, and fast website.

The Key Elements

  • Design: Testing on multiple browser capabilities, and screen sizes and resolutions. Valid HTML and CSS coding.
  • Navigation: The ability to find information
  • Usability: Including features that aid users and avoiding those that irritate them
  • Content: Information in the language of your users.
  • SEO: Optimizing a site for search engines is more than improving your rankings, it’s about engineering your site so users can find it using a search engine — clear content and keywords.
  • Social Media: In May of 2011, US web users spent 53,457,259 minutes on Facebook. Nielson reports that people don’t like doing business on Facebook. But a personal website might be effective.
  • Tracking and Analytics: 80% of all websites used Google Analytics in 2011, but the important thing is using the data from your analytics to  learn what your users are reading and looking for on your site, and how they get there. That doesn’t mean being user driven. It does mean looking at what is important to you and measuring it against what your users are viewing. You may need to present yourself more clearly.
  • Footer: Don’t slack off at the footer. Repeat navigation links, include your copyright, and contact information, including your company name.

The infographic from Visual.ly:

The Anatomy of a Perfect Website

Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

 

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Photo of Rachel Andrew

Rachel Andrew

Start Small and Listen. That is Rachel Andrew‘s advice in this helpful article in Smashing Magazine. No matter how many articles you have read on business, one more is never a bad idea. This one is likely to contain both new ideas and reminders for you.

Building a Successful Product: Start Small and Listen

“The goal of a startup is to find the sweet-spot where minimum product and viable product meet — get people to fall in love with you. Over time, you listen to your customers, make improvements and raise the bar on what viable means — making it more expensive for competitors to jump in.”

– John Radoff