Category Archives: Simple

WordCount

Another fabulous gem from the UK. WordCount is a ranking of the 86,800 most used words in the English language by frequency of use. Presented in the same format as a timeline—a beautiful timeline. Very minimalist and elegant. Perfectly simple. The design itself is worth the effort. You can also use it to analyze the vocabulary on your site—are the words you are using common, if understanding is your goal, or rare if sounding obtuse is  your goal.

From the site:

WordCount data currently comes from the British National Corpus (BNC), a 100 million word collection of samples of written and spoken language from a wide range of sources, designed to represent an accurate cross-section of current English usage. WordCount includes all words that occur at least twice in the BNC. In the future, WordCount will be modified to track word usage within any desired text, website, and eventually the entire Internet.

You can scroll the horizontal line of words or search for a specific word. Very interesting results. Then you can go to QueryCount that tracks the words that people search. Note: A screenshot of those words would be R-rated.

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Editorially logo and tagline: The Best Writing is Rewriting

Editorially: The Best Writing is Rewriting

Stet’s full title is Stet: A Writer’s Journal on Culture and Technology. Many wonderful articles on how writing on for the web.

It is published by Editorially: The Best Writing is Rewriting, a collaborative writing forum.

STET’s goal is to demystify writing by drawing attention to how writing works. To that end, STET pairs good writing with notes that explain what makes writing good.

Topics on STET range across culture and technology, with special attention paid to the intersections between them. We aim to be as accessible and interesting to both practitioners and users of technology. You won’t find insider lingo here; you will find astute, well-written, and nuanced takes on subjects both timely and timeless.

The title pays homage to a discussion between writer and editor, in which one or the other marks a change “stet,” meaning “let it stand.” It suggests both discussion and revision, elements which we believe are at the heart of good writing.

Simple Design, Short Names, No Ads

Flexi Websites are simple, and becoming simpler. It takes time to learn to leave out what people don’t really need to know, but we’re getting there.

Simplifying the Internet

Today’s examples of simple are from a post by  on the BuzzFeed FWD website. It includes examples of simple design sites and the new attitude: “Welcome To The New Internet: Simple Design, Short Names, No Ads”

These examples are publishing platforms directed at simplifying and redesigning blogs. John Herrman writes:

In recent months, at least four of the most interesting new startups — all either from or backed by people with deep roots in the current internet, including Twitter cofounders and many of the most prominent VCs in Silicon Valley — have been launched to, in some way, replace the internet. Not add to it, or change some part. These sites want to fix the whole thing: to remake comments, content, and updates with little to no encumbrance from the current web.

Simple Blogging Websites

 

 

The Perfect Website

Addressing the key elements of the perfect website as simply as possible is the basis for designing an affordable, effective, and fast website.

The Key Elements

  • Design: Testing on multiple browser capabilities, and screen sizes and resolutions. Valid HTML and CSS coding.
  • Navigation: The ability to find information
  • Usability: Including features that aid users and avoiding those that irritate them
  • Content: Information in the language of your users.
  • SEO: Optimizing a site for search engines is more than improving your rankings, it’s about engineering your site so users can find it using a search engine — clear content and keywords.
  • Social Media: In May of 2011, US web users spent 53,457,259 minutes on Facebook. Nielson reports that people don’t like doing business on Facebook. But a personal website might be effective.
  • Tracking and Analytics: 80% of all websites used Google Analytics in 2011, but the important thing is using the data from your analytics to  learn what your users are reading and looking for on your site, and how they get there. That doesn’t mean being user driven. It does mean looking at what is important to you and measuring it against what your users are viewing. You may need to present yourself more clearly.
  • Footer: Don’t slack off at the footer. Repeat navigation links, include your copyright, and contact information, including your company name.

The infographic from Visual.ly:

The Anatomy of a Perfect Website

Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.